Anything is Possible!

With Love, Hope, and Perseverance


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Thursday Tree Love: Trees Near the Sea

Trinity Trees

You take root in sandy soil

Reaching  deep into the earth

Standing strong in fierce winds

You bend but don’t break.

Challenges build character.

Sunset at Sander's Point

These photos were taken at Trinity Center near the Carolina Coast. It’s been at least a year since I walked the grounds there. They have a habit of building around trees as much as possible which is better than cutting them down.

Tree in deck

Lodging 2

At Trinity Center, there’s a tunnel that goes under the main road and leads to the beach. This live oak stands watch.

Tunnel Exit (2)

#Thursday Tree Love is a  photo feature hosted by Parul Thakur on 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. For more information, please visit:

https://www.happinessandfood.com/thursdaytreelove-61/

 


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Thursday Tree Love: Blooming Dogwoods

The dogwoods are blooming!

dog wood blooming

dog wood branches .JPG

dogwood close up

I took the top three photos Tuesday in our current neighborhood. The next one is a dogwood standing in front of a pine tree taken a few years ago. They look like friends, don’t they? I bet their roots intertwine and they hold on to each other during storms.

dogwood in front of pine

Love Letters to Tress:

The city of Melbourne, Australia gave email addresses to trees in case citizens wanted to notify the city about problems that needed to be addressed. But people also wrote love letters and greetings directly to the trees. You can read some of those letters in this article:  When You Give a Tree and Email Address

#ThursdayTreelove is a photo feature hosted by Parul Thakur at  https://www.happinessandfood.com on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. For more information, visit https://www.happinessandfood.com/thursdaytreelove-60/


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Thursday Tree Love on a Hillside

Tree on Boone Hillside

I took this photo a few years ago in the Appalachian Mountains. The tree with it’s outstretched arms seems to be saying, welcome.

Here’s another photo from the same area.

Boone Hillside w trees

Today, I’m celebrating trees who have weathered storms. They are not symmetrical. They might not be majestic by our standards, but they are still full of wisdom and grace.

Thursday Tree love is a photo feature hosted on 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month at:

https://www.happinessandfood.com/thursdaytreelove-59/

The next edition will be live on March 28, 2019. If you would like to play along, post a picture of a tree on your blog and link it back to this post.

 

 

 


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Good News Tuesday: Trees for Australia, More Mental Health, Public Lands, New Inventions, and Neighborly Sign Language

Australia to Plant 1 Billion Trees

Australia plans to plant 1 billion trees by 2050 as part of the country’s plan to meet Paris Agreement climate goals. The new forestry plan would support jobs and help the economy.  My Goodnewsletter led me to this article in The Straits Times.

Australia (2)

Mental Health Treatment Facility Replaces Old Jail house

“Los Angeles County supervisors … approved a plan Tuesday to tear down the dungeon-like Men’s Central Jail downtown and build at least one mental health treatment facility in its place.”  The new facility would be run by the Department of Health Services instead of the Sheriff’s Department and would be staffed by the mental health workers with deputies providing security. You can read more in this LA Times article.

Hope for Public Land Protection in the US

The U.S. Senate voted to support a bipartisan public lands package that protects more than 2 million acres of land and adds more than 1.3 million acres of new wilderness in western states. The Good News Network reports “The bill was passed in a 92-8 vote, and White House officials have divulged that the president has agreed to sign it, according to The Washington Post.

 

 

 

 

New Inventions from Africa

The following article from The Guardian highlights inventions by contenders for the Royal Academy of Engineering Africa prize. Designs include gloves that translate sign language into speech and a system which captures water from the air and converts it into drinking water using solar technology. I love it when  technology is used for good.

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/jan/01/africa-inspired-inventors-royal-academy-of-engineering-prize

You can listen to the article in this video:

 

 

Neighbors Learn Sign Language

The neighbors in this Massachusetts community got together and organized a sign language class so they could communicate with 2 year old Samantha. Steve Hartman reports this touching story for “On the Road”

 

Sunflower w address

Got good news? Feel free to share in the comments!

 

 


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Thursday Tree Love: A Morning Hike in Southern Pines

trees tops above

I’ve been wanting to share the photos from our Christmas morning hike and realized I could do it for Thursday Tree Love  a photo feature hosted by Parul Thakur on 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. Yes, I know I’m at least three holidays behind, but I do love trees. The Christmas hike was important since we were away from home and I needed to be reminded of the constants in my life, my love for nature, and the grand design of a power greater than myself. It was a beautiful morning to walk the easy winding trail through southern pines with David and Doodle.

Dave walking Doodle stretching (2)

 

trail through trees w blue sky

Dave looking up

tree tops above

 

JoAnne smilingin the trees

trees in blue sky

For more on #ThursdayTreeLove visit   at


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#ThursdayTreeLove: Revelations from a Hard Decision

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I discovered #ThursdayTreeLove when Chandra’s post led me to it. See below for a link to the Thursday Tree Love host.

It was a hard decision I didn’t want to make and still don’t want to think about, but the revelation it brought is important. My husband told me the mimosa next to the house had to come down so they could add the rain gutters. Water damage is what led to the major renovations that have had us living in my parents’ old house since September. We could almost buy a new house with the money we’re spending on repairs. As the overhang on our house is practically non-existent, rain gutters are needed. It’s been so long, at least 25 years, that I don’t remember if that mimosa sprouted there on it’s own or if I transplanted it from a more obviously wrong spot. It took root at least a foot, maybe two, from the corner of the house. Now I know that is too close. It’s a hard lesson.

As you might know, my love for trees is powerful. I have a particular fondness for the misunderstood mimosa. When David and I reconnected in 2011, I didn’t know that he would become my husband, but one of the first things I told him was that I was a tree-hugger. He said he was too. That was good to hear, though I doubted that he could have the depth of tree love that I did.

After David told me the mimosa next to the house had to go, I asked him if we could just trim some of the branches. He said no because the tree really was right next to the house. I knew that. The main trunk had grown to be just a few inches from the house, touching the house when the wind blows hard, and major branches draped over the roof in the summertime. I asked David to take care of it and said that I don’t want to be there. I don’t want to see any remains. It’s too painful for me. We’re staying an hour away, and David commutes almost daily, so he would have plenty of opportunity to do it.

A few days later, David came “home” after working in the yard at our more permanent address. He said he took down the mimosa. He told me he said a prayer for it first. He got choked up talking about it. There were tears in his eyes. David’s feelings for this tree shocked me. I knew he cared, but he does not show emotion easily, though has shown it in grieving for dogs. David is strong and very practical, almost Vulcan-like at times which can be irritating but is more often comforting in it’s steadiness.

I knew David told me he was a “tree-hugger” back when we reconnected, but I didn’t know he could feel this depth of emotion for a tree. I didn’t know it would be hard for him. I didn’t ask him to say a prayer – that was all his idea. I just asked him to take care of it, and he did. I thanked him for caring so much and gave him a big hug. The gift in the sadness is that I have a new appreciation for the depth of my husband’s compassion. A person can have a big heart even if he doesn’t wear it on his sleeve.

David makes things from reclaimed wood, fallen trees, or trees that have to be cut down. He said the wood from the mimosa is a beautiful and pink. He hopes to make many beautiful things from it in his wood shop. I hope some day I can bear to look at them.

More mimosas live my backyard, thankfully not close to the house. I call them prolific rather than invasive, and have given a few away. I’m sure some of them came from the mimosa that took root too close to the house all those years ago.

mimosa flowers on path

Mimosa flowers in the back yard

 

Thursday Tree love is a photo feature on Happiness and Food, hosted on 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. The next edition will be live on February 14, 2019. If you would like to play along, post a picture of a tree on your blog and link it back to the post on happiness and food:  https://www.happinessandfood.com/thursdaytreelove-56/

 


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The Cedar by the Sidewalk

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Sap runs through your veins

I would take a sip if you offered it,

But this is your blood.

I’ve seen it drip when you are cut.

Should I prune you?

Should I separate the branches

that hang low over the sidewalk

From your trunk?

I’m sure if I asked you and you told me

You would prefer not.

They say it’s good to prune trees.

It’s something we humans

are supposed to do.

I will not ask you.

I will ask my love

To cut the branches

Hanging low over the sidewalk

When I’m not looking –

When I’m far away,

And you are sleeping

While I sop applesauce

with my pancakes.

I’m sure the neighbors

will be happy.

 

squirrel in cedar tree

A squirrel sits in my untidy cedar by the sidewalk.

And one more thing:

natural wonders of trees

Thank a tree.

 

 For today’s SoCS prompt, Linda gave us this list of words or word parts to use as we see fit:

sap, sep, sip, sop, and sup.

She also told us that SEP stands for someone else’s problem. I suppose the cedar limbs hanging over the sidewalk are my responsibility, but to be honest, they are only a problem for people taller than me, or when it rains a lot and they hang lower, or occasionally snows which is every couple years. Anyway, I hope David does the deed during the winter when I suppose trees are sleeping.

To read more fascinating ways these S words show up in streams of consciousness and for more information of  “Someone Else’s Problem” which I could have written about since I tend to take on other peoples problems though not so much anymore, visit Linda’s blog:

https://lindaghill.com/2019/01/04/the-friday-reminder-for-socs-jusjojan-2019-daily-prompt-jan-5th/

Here are the rules for SoCS:

1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write.

2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop.

3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For instance, I will not say “Write about dogs”; the prompt will be more like, “Make your first sentence a question,” “Begin with the word ‘The’,” or simply a single word to get your started.

4. Ping back! It’s important, so that I and other people can come and read your post! For example, in your post you can write “This post is part of SoCS:” and then copy and paste the URL found in your address bar at the top of this post into yours. Your link will show up in my comments for everyone to see. The most recent pingbacks will be found at the top. NOTE: Pingbacks only work from WordPress sites. If you’re self-hosted or are participating from another host, such as Blogger, please leave a link to your post in the comments below.

5. Read at least one other person’s blog who has linked back their post. Even better, read everyone’s! If you’re the first person to link back, you can check back later, or go to the previous week, by following my category, “Stream of Consciousness Saturday,” which you’ll find right below the “Like” button on my post.

6. Copy and paste the rules (if you’d like to) in your post. The more people who join in, the more new bloggers you’ll meet and the bigger your community will get!

7. As a suggestion, tag your post “SoCS” and/or “#SoCS” for more exposure and more views.

8. Have fun!