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With Love, Hope, and Perseverance


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Good News Tuesday: Compassion, Change, and Singing

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California Votes for Cruelty Free Cosmetics

California just passed a law that will make it illegal to sell cosmetics or ingredients that have been tested on animals. The California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act will go into effect in January of 2020. Read more below from The Good News Network:

https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/california-has-just-approved-law-requiring-all-cosmetics-to-be-cruelty-free/#.W7JziKaNjSc.facebook

Rising Out of Hatred through Kindness

Derek Black, the son of a KKK Grand Wizard and godson of David Duke, broke free from the white nationalist movement. It was a gradual process that started when he went to college and his friend Matthew invited him to a Friday night Shabbat dinner. You can read more in this article or watch the video below. The discussion about change starts about four and a half minutes into the video.

 

Singing is Good for You!

It’s not hot off the presses, but here are some surprising ways singing can improve your mental and physical health:

http://vkool.com/benefits-of-singing/

Got good news? Share it!

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Awesome Stories 364

I’m happy to re-blog these Awesome Stories from Brad. Listening to Lek Chailert gives me hope. Seeing the love she shares with elephants always brings me a big heart smile. She is a hero of compassion. The other stories are important, too. We need to focus on solutions to help planet Earth and a healthier flow for change.

writing to freedom

This week Awesome Stories brings you climate solutions, compassionate care, and healthy change.

Climate Solutions

People need solutions. They don’t need more data, they need narrative. ..The only way we’re going to get out of this is to have a practical vision that we can all work towards. ~ Paul Hawken

climate solutions, Awesome StoriesI agree with Paul Hawken’s view that we need more focus on solutions, vision, and story, and less on the science and data. Too much information just locks in our paralysis and analysis. The world needs our actions, now! In reality, as Paul’s book Drawdown points out, we already have the technology to deal with climate change, but we need a shift in how we talk, write, and think about climate change. Currently, we’re locked into a mode of “fighting” climate change. As Paul points out, you can’t fight the climate. It is simply feedback from the planet giving us an…

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For the Dogs: Two Stories of Compassion

First, a story of miraculous healing. It  may be a little hard to watch at the very beginning, but it soon gets better and has a  happy ending.  I love how people didn’t give up on Thor and how he never gave up on himself.

 

This next story is about saving the abandoned dogs of Chernobyl. Some were hunted and killed by government officials. The survivors have been on their own for multiple generations, yet many are still friendly to humans.  I’m so thankful that the people of the Clean Futures Fund are stepping up to take care of these dogs.

 

Got good news? Feel free to share in the comments!

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Extending Compassion To All Living Things

I found this one-liner at Healing Soul Streams,  where blessings flow in abundance.

Extend our Circle of compassion Albert Schweitzer

Let us extend our compassion to all living things, including ourselves.

One-Liner Wednesday is extended to us by Linda G. Hill at

https://lindaghill.com/2017/03/22/one-liner-wednesday-any-takers/

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The One-Liner Wednesday rules (which I sometimes follow) are:

1. Make it one sentence.

2. Try to make it either funny or inspirational.

3. Use our unique tag #1linerWeds.

4. Add our very cool badge to your post for extra exposure!

5. Have fun!


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Having Compassion for Our “Shoulds”

Loving Me, Too

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My mother never seemed like a dominating person. I remember her as patient and kind and much more easy to manipulate than my father who served in the marine corps until I was well into my teens. But in later years, when I observed my mother with my pre-teen daughter, I noticed a lot of “shoulds” directed at my daughter. Mom was trying to help of course. I wondered if the “shoulds” had always been there, if they had been handed down to me and incorporated so deeply into my psyche, that I wasn’t consciously aware of their abundance.

A couple days ago, I found this article  among the “Awesome Stories”  at “Writing to Freedom.” In “Seeking Wholeness,” Patty de Llosa, writes about accepting all aspects of ourselves, the good, the bad, and the parts of ourselves we try to push away and might not even be aware…

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From Prison Cells to Sanctuaries

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I have mixed feelings about zoos. I enjoyed taking my kids to the Milwaukee Zoo when they were young, and the zoo in Asheboro, NC had a lot of wide open spaces when we visited many years ago. Still, the big cats could have had more room. These zoos are more like parks, with some cages. The elephants, rhinos and antelope had plenty of pasture to roam. They were a far sight better than the roadside zoos which unfortunately still exist.

The zoos where animals are caged in spaces that remind me of prison cells should be illegal by now. I imagine what it would be like to have to stay in my living room all the time. That’s what some cages in roadside zoos are like for lions, and tigers and bears. They pace back and forth. I hate to even think about it.

In an ideal world, there would be no zoos, only sanctuaries and parks with natural habitats. But since zoos do exist, we can be sure to only support the most humane and natural facilities, or none at all. I applaud the work of Jane Goodall who has done so much to improve conditions for chimps, and those who create and maintain sanctuaries like the one Shirley goes to in this moving video:

We can make a world with no chains and no more cages, a world with love and compassion.

Today’s stream of consciousness prompt was, “zoo.” If you’d like to find out where your stream of consciousness take you, visit:

https://lindaghill.com/2016/04/29/the-friday-reminder-and-prompt-for-socs-april-3016/

Here are the rules:

1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write.

2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop.

3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For instance, I will not say “Write about dogs”; the prompt will be more like, “Make your first sentence a question,” “Begin with the word ‘The’,” or simply a single word to get your started.

4. Ping back! It’s important, so that I and other people can come and read your post! For example, in your post you can write “This post is part of SoCS:” and then copy and paste the URL found in your address bar at the top of this post into yours.  Your link will show up in my comments for everyone to see. The most recent pingbacks will be found at the top.

5. Read at least one other person’s blog who has linked back their post. Even better, read everyone’s! If you’re the first person to link back, you can check back later, or go to the previous week, by following my category, “Stream of Consciousness Saturday,” which you’ll find right below the “Like” button on my post.

6. Copy and paste the rules (if you’d like to) in your post. The more people who join in, the more new bloggers you’ll meet and the bigger your community will get!

7. As a suggestion, tag your post “SoCS” and/or “#SoCS” for more exposure and more views.

8. Have fun!

 

 


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The White Room

I’m re-blogging this story, written by Victo Dolore, in honor of Ruthie, my former co-worker who died from ovarian cancer. Ruthie was full of compassion for every human being. She worked especially hard to fight the stigma against pregnant women addicted to drugs. She worked to teach compassion to medical professionals in delivery and the NICU. She would love this story so much. To learn more about Ruthie and her continuing mission, you can visit: http://www.championsforcompassion.com/