Anything is Possible!

With Hope, Faith, and Perseverance


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Awesome Stories 364

I’m happy to re-blog these Awesome Stories from Brad. Listening to Lek Chailert gives me hope. Seeing the love she shares with elephants always brings me a big heart smile. She is a hero of compassion. The other stories are important, too. We need to focus on solutions to help planet Earth and a healthier flow for change.

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This week Awesome Stories brings you climate solutions, compassionate care, and healthy change.

Climate Solutions

People need solutions. They don’t need more data, they need narrative. ..The only way we’re going to get out of this is to have a practical vision that we can all work towards. ~ Paul Hawken

climate solutions, Awesome StoriesI agree with Paul Hawken’s view that we need more focus on solutions, vision, and story, and less on the science and data. Too much information just locks in our paralysis and analysis. The world needs our actions, now! In reality, as Paul’s book Drawdown points out, we already have the technology to deal with climate change, but we need a shift in how we talk, write, and think about climate change. Currently, we’re locked into a mode of “fighting” climate change. As Paul points out, you can’t fight the climate. It is simply feedback from the planet giving us an…

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#WATWB: The Love of a Brother

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12 year-old Noah Aldrich has finished 15 triathlons pulling or pushing his brother Lucas. Lucas has a rare neurological condition that makes him unable to walk or talk, but he has a strong brother who loves him dearly.  I was moved by the Noah’s humility and perseverance shown in this video.

 

This story is offered as part of the We Are the World Blogfest which seeks to share and promote positive news stories. For more information, visit;

http://www.damyantiwrites.com/we-are-the-world-blogfest/

and check out the Facebook Page.

 

In darkness, be light.

GUIDELINES for WATWB:

  1. Keep your post to below 500 words, as much as possible.
  2. All we ask is you link to a human news story on your blog on the last Friday of each month, one that shows love, humanity, and brotherhood. Something like this news  about a man who only fosters terminally ill children.
  3. Join us on the last Friday of each month in sharing news that warms the cockles of our heart. No story is too big or small, as long as it goes beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity.
  4. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD Badge on your sidebar, and help us spread the word on social media. Tweets, Facebook shares, G+ shares using the #WATWB hashtag through the month most welcome. More Blogfest signups mean more friends, love and light for all of us.
  5. We’ll read and comment on each others’ posts, get to know each other better, and hopefully, make or renew some friendships with everyone who signs on as participants in the coming months.
  6. To signup, add your link in WE ARE THE WORLD Linky List


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Mr. Rogers: Recognizing A Different Kind of Hero

He always was a hero. Now, people are recognizing  that we need more heroes like Fred Rogers. If anybody deserves his own stamp, it’s him.

Fred Rogers was a champion for children’s television and wrote the music for his TV show, Mr Roger’s Neighborhood. He was also an ordained minister and obtained a pilot’s license while still in high school.[8]  Some other things I learned about him from Wikipedia are that he was “red-green color blind,” swam every day, and he was a vegetarian on ethical grounds.

 AND they’re making a  movie about him starring Tom Hanks!

 

In the following video, Fred Rogers is testifying in the 1969 Senate Hearing on behalf of public funding for children’s television.

Here’s an excerpt:

“If we… can make it clear that feelings are mentionable and manageable we will have done a great service for mental health. I think that it’s much more dramatic that two men could be working out their feelings of anger, much more dramatic than showing something of gunfire. I’m constantly concerned about what our children are seeing.”    ___ Mr. Fred Rogers

 

 That’s my good news offering for today.

Got good news? Please share!

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Finally Understanding My Mother

Mom JoAne Mary Kaye 1967 (2)

1967

Like another lifetime

Yet the same lives,

My dad, your husband,

Is off fighting the war

In Vietnam.

Your thoughts are with him,

Wondering, is he safe?

Is he hungry?

Will he make it home?

Not wanting to think about it,

Not wanting to watch the news,

But worrying nonetheless.

My little sister wonders too

Though it looks like she’s playing

Making lines in the dirt

Like a meditation.

I stand quietly.

Thinking. Pondering.

Wondering how to help.

Maybe just standing by your side.

Is enough.

 

Now, I understand

How strong you really were.

 

This photo is one of the treasures I’ve found as I go through the things that belonged to my parents, Betty and Jim. It was taken in 1967 when my father was in Vietnam and we were visiting relatives in Connecticut. Whoever took it had a good eye for capturing the moment. It’s very different from most of the photos I find where my mother is older, posing with a smile or volunteering at church or the soup kitchen with Dad.

When I was growing up, my mother suffered from depression that caused her to be hospitalized more than once. The last nervous breakdowns came when Dad was in Vietnam. For many years I thought of my mother as weak. She was always kind, but a little fuzzy in the brain. I wanted her to be strong.

Now, I get the fuzzy brain too, like: “why did I come into this room?” Now, when I look at this photo, I feel compassion.

After Mom died in 2008, I asked my dad what helped him get through the horrors that haunted him from Vietnam – things he didn’t want to talk about because they gave him nightmares.

“It was your mother’s love,” he told me.

I always knew they loved each other very much. But I had not known this:

My mother’s love was strong enough to save the strongest man I’ve ever known.

Yesterday, I wished my mom a happy birthday.  I’m glad she and Dad are together again. Strong in faith. Strong in love.

 


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Guess What I Found in my Attic!

Last week, I worked on cleaning out my attic. It was a dirty, sneezy job. I hauled paper and cardboard to the recycle bin, trashed the un-recyclables, and salvaged the action figures for my grandsons.

action figures lined up

 

But the coolest thing I found in the attic was my poetry notebook from high school.

Notebook from 1972

 

One poem written in 1972 is “prophetic” as my husband called it. David’s family moved away at the end of tenth grade. I must have written this right after he left, hoping against the odds that I would see him again and believing our love would stay alive.

Notebook page from 1972

 

I was so full of hope at 16. Angsty hope. But David didn’t answer my last letter that summer of ’72, and life went on. Over the years, my first love became a distant memory.

If I’d found this notebook in my 30s, I would have shaken my head and thought, “How sappy.” But now, it reinforces that this love story was meant to be. Our love never died. It just went dormant and waited quietly for 39 years.

You can read about those 39 years and the lessons we learned along the way in

Trust the Timing, A Memoir of Finding Love Again.

Did I really know our love would stay alive? Or did I help manifest our re-connection? Was it all part of God’s plan? Did the angels see a window of opportunity and nudge us in the right direction?

I vote for all of the above.

Oh, how I wish today’s teenagers only had learning and love to deal with.

 

Hang on to your hopes.

 

Good things coming

 


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Love’s Answer to Hate

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Today, I share two stories of interfaith support.

This past Sunday, just a few days after a church received a hateful, racist letter, the pews are filled with strangers showing support.

Read more:  Hate knocked on the door, and love answered.

and

In this article from the Christian Science Monitor, we read about Jews building bridges with Muslims as they join together in community.

Got good news? Share it


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Agape Love

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To love others well, we need fill our own emptiness with divine love that never ends. Agape love is unconditional. Agape is the kind of love God feels for us even when we don’t feel it ourselves.

As Anne Lamott described it:

“You were loved because God loves, period. God loved you, and everyone, not because you believed in certain things, but because you were a mess, and lonely, and His or Her child. God loved you no matter how crazy you felt on the inside, no matter what a fake you were; always, even in your current condition, even before coffee. God loves you crazily, like I love you…like a slightly overweight auntie, who sees only your marvelousness and need.”

I remember feeling that love in church 17 years ago during one of the worst periods of my life. I was a mess. Loneliness and grief had driven me to things that make me shudder, now. But God still loved me anyway.

I looked up at the Good Shepherd in the stained-glass window as he cradled the lamb in his arm. At that moment, love settled upon me, tangible love, as if someone had come behind me and gently wrapped a soft blanket around my shoulders.

Trust the Timing

God never left me. When I was lost, The Good Shepherd came to find me as in this beautiful song from Red Letters:

 

~

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