Anything is Possible!

With Love, Hope, and Perseverance


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SoCS: Crocs, Gators, and a Birthday Hike

Our Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “roc.” We are to find a word with “roc” in it or use it as a word all by itself, and enjoy!

Crocodiles are different from alligators. We have alligators here in North Carolina. I’ve seen them at the lake and less often in the creek not far from my house. Alligators are not as aggressive as crocodiles. I have to admit that I researched the differences before starting this stream. I was curious! But I’m still writing in SoCS style and did a minimum of planning. I think that’s the rule.

I used to think there were no crocodiles in the US, but read that southern Florida is the only place where gators and crocs coexist. Crocs have pointier snouts. I guess I thought gator snouts were pointy because that’s how they look in the water. Crocs live in South America and Africa. I’m glad gators aren’t that aggressive, at least to people, but you have to be careful not to let small dogs or cats run around gator territory. Don’t want to think too much about that.

How about this sign?

WARNING: Beware of Alligators

Is that sign just weathered, or did the alligators come up and rub those letters so you couldn’t read them? Why would they do that? Why would I even imagine that? Too much imagination. Let’s move on.

Crocs are a brand of functional shoes. I love my crocs sandals with lots of cushioning. The first pair I had lasted at least two years. Then each pair afterward seemed to last less time. It helps if I don’t wear them to do yoga outside. Seems I need more and more cushioning under my old feet. No more going barefoot. Maybe that’s a good thing. My feet will be a little safer from crocs, gators, and snakes when I go on hikes to the creek or my urban forest.

On Tuesday we went on a birthday hike for my daughter’s 28th birthday to a nature preserve across the bridge in the next county. There were places where alligators might have been hiding. No crocs though. We did see a turtle. (It looked like a turtle, but there was no water nearby so maybe it was a tortoise?) We hiked lots of varied terrain – woods, fields, and swamp. Not many rocks though like up north in the mountains. Glad it was too early for the mosquitoes to be out in force. I’ve only seen a few, but it’s been very dry here lately. It won’t be long…. Anyway, here a few photos from my daughter’s birthday hike.

~~~

Today’s prompt is brought to you by our SoCS post, Linda Hill. You can find rules and more streams of consciousness by clicking the link below:

The Friday Reminder and Prompt for #SoCS May 22, 2021 | (lindaghill.com)


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Good News Tuesday for April 20, 2021: Edible Food Wrap, Green Funeral Movement, Earth Day Summit, Saving Bees at the Airport, and Successful Giraffe Rescue

Seeking Balance One Tuesday at a Time

Edible Food Wrap Made from Algae and Cinnamon

Scientists from India and Russia have used algae and cinnamon to create an edible, transparent food wrap. The film wraps keep food fresh longer and are also water-soluble. Read more about the process and the science in this article from the Good News Network.

One Option in the Green Funeral Movement

Better Place Forests buys and maintains land for “memorial forest preserves” in Connecticut, Massachusetts, California, Arizona, Minnesota, and soon Illinois as reported in this article from The Good News Network . The article explains, “Every year the (traditional) funeral industry consumes 20 million feet of hardwood, 64,500 tons of steel, 1.6 million tons of concrete, and 5 million gallons of embalming chemicals.” I’d much rather my ashes be in the forest. I might not need my own tree, and the company does not offer cremation, but I still think it’s a step in the right direction. For more information, you can visit: Better Place Forests.

US Hosts Earth Day Summit

US President Joe Biden will host a virtual climate change summit with 40 world leaders on Earth Day. Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg will testify before Congress. Thanks for listening, President Biden! Here’s more.

Saving Bees at the Pittsburg International Airport

When airport wildlife administrator Ben Shertzer found several bee colonies living on the underside of a plane’s wings, master beekeeper Steve Repasky was brought in and relocated the bees. In time, they created apiaries in the woods and fields around the airport. The Good News Network tells more about the project.

Giraffe Rescue Completed

Giraffes in Kenya were transported safely to their new home after their peninsula was cut off by flooding. The Good News Movement reports: “After months of effort, a mother giraffe and her calf were rescued from an island as rising waters of Lake Baringo in Kenya. Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) and conservation partners said the rescue of the last two ….. marks the conclusion of a mammoth rescue effort that started in December 2020.”

It’s wonderful to see the care people have put into saving these giraffes.

Got good news?

Please share your good news story or post a link to your GNT post in the comments!


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Good News Tuesday for March 23, 2021: First Native American in US Cabinet, New Dialysis Facility in India, Economic Benefits of Protecting Nature, Gorilla Fund Donations, and Great Grandma Zooms in on Exercise Class

Seeking Balance One Tuesday at a Time

Deb Haaland Confirmed as US Interior secretary and the first Native American on US Cabinet

The Senate voted 51 to 40 on March 15 to confirm Congresswoman Deb Haaland  to be Interior secretary, making her the first Native American to hold a Cabinet secretary post. Here’s more from CBS News.

You can learn more about Secretary Haaland in this recording of her accepting the nomination.

New Dialysis Facility in India Opens with Free Services

The Delhi Sikh Gurdwara Management Committee (DSGMC) launched “India’s biggest” kidney dialysis facility that will offer dialysis to 101 patients simultaneously free of cost. Here’s more from tribuneindia.com.

Study Clarifies the Economic Benefits of Protecting Nature

In the largest-ever study of its kind, a team led by the University of Cambridge concluded, “The economic benefits of conserving or restoring natural sites now “outweigh” the profit potential of converting them for intensive human use.” Most of us already know that, but it’s good to have documented research back up. Read more about the study here.

Gorilla Fund Receives Huge Donations

The Diane Fossey Gorilla fund has received “hundreds of thousands of dollars” in donations from the WallStreetBets subreddit. You can read more about here in the Gorilla Fund’s statement.

102-Year-Old Joins PE Zoom Class with Six-Year-Old Great Grandson

Julia Fulkerson recently got to exercise with her great grandson after his parents were vaccinated. Here’s the story from Good Morning America. I don’t know about you, but I’m inspired! Here’s a video:

Got Good News?

Please feel free to share your good news or GNT post in the comments!


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SoCS: Buttercups!

Today’s Stream of Consciousness prompt is “butter.”

We are not going to write about, wait, who’s we? Me and the cat? She’s not interested in writing. She just wants to cuddle since she hid most of the day yesterday in the bedroom where maybe she was trapped. I don’t know. But I don’t want to write about the first thing that popped into my head, the butter in the refrigerator and object of my cheating in my endeavors to be vegan for lent. I’d rather write about the second thing that popped into my head:

Buttercup!

Photo of buttercups my daughter, Ayla, took in the mountains

Then, I thought of Princess Buttercup in The Princess Bride and found this commentary about how she is not just a typical, helpless, fairy tale princess. She is not in love with the prince. She loves to ride her horse. It made me like her more. I didn’t realize until recently that the same woman who played Princess Buttercup, played Jenny in Forest Gump. Back to the commentary.

Horses and freedom. My horse phase was more than a phase. I actually had my own horse in my twenties. I miss horses. And the beach. But there’s no reason I know of that we can’t go back to the things we love in some way or other – if it’s meant to be, we will find a way. Trust the Timing.

Spring is coming. With buttercups!

That was way more fun that writing about my awful side effects from Moderna 1 and 2. But that is over and done with, and I’m very glad. I survived, and I’m thankful for my strong immune reaction.

Buttercups! Daisies! Roses! Orchids!

Check out the orchids and other flowers blooming in time lapse from Nat Geo! They even have fairy tale like music to go with the images of Princess Bride riding her horse. That’s my stream of consciousness for this Saturday.

But wait!

I forgot all about sharing that commercial where they sing the buttercup song. Can I have three videos in one post? Let’s see! I’m not promoting the product. I just love TV commercials that use old songs like this. I’d totally be singing with her if I was in the store. It doesn’t matter that the lyrics are sorta sad. It’s got a good beat and it’s easy to sing to.

For more on Stream of Consciousness Saturday, like rules and stuff, visit our host, Linda Hill at the link below!

The Friday Reminder and Prompt for #SoCS March 6, 2021 | (lindaghill.com)


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Good News Tuesday for Feb. 16, 2021: Successful Program Responds to Non-Violent Police Calls, Repair Don’t Waste, Wardrobe Donation, and Plastic Bricks

Seeking Balance One Tuesday at a Time

Successful Colorado Program Relieves Police from Non-Violent Calls

Sending health care specialists to non-violent calls frees up police to focus on fighting crime. Since June 1, a program in Colorado has been sending a paramedic and a mental health professional out to handle low level incidents like trespassing and mental health episodes that would have fallen to police. These STAR teams focus on assessment and connecting people with services.

“In its first six months, the Support Team Assisted Response program, or STAR, has responded to 748 (nonviolent) incidents. None required police or led to arrests or jail time.” Here are the details from Denver.

Europe’s Movement toward Repair instead of Waste

The EU’s eco-design regulations are moving forward in March with a regulation that will “define standards for repair and useful life making it easier to repair washing machines, dishwashers, refrigerators and monitors. France is introducing an anti-waste law with a repair index for a wider variety of appliances and devices and aims to make 60% of devices repairable by 2026. You can read more from Next City here.

Alex Trebek’s Family Donates Wardrobe

Alex Trebek’s Jeopardy wardrobe is being donated to The Doe Fund, a charity that provides, “work, housing, vocational training, continuing education and comprehensive social services to underserved Americans with histories of addiction, homelessness and incarceration.” Good Morning America has more on the story.

Or this could be for WATWB? Look for the CBS News video of the Atlanta school counselor who runs a food pantry. His name is Anthony at Carver Elementary in Atlanta

Bricks from Plastic

Yes, we need to reduce our use of plastics, but we can also recycle and repurpose. Nzambi Matee of Kenya is a materials engineer and head of Gjenge Makers, which produces sustainable low-cost construction bricks made of recycled plastic and sand. They are winners of the Young Champions of the Earth Award. Ms. Matee will tell you more about their work in this video:

Got good news?

Feel free to share in the comments!


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JusJoJan: Beach Photos

Today’s Just Jot January prompt is: Beach.

I have lots of photos of the beach! Here are a few from 2020.

Sometimes we see bunnies in these Dunes
Intracoastal Waterway southeastern North Carolina

For more on Just Jot January, visit our host, Linda Hill, at

#JusJoJan prompt the 28th – “Beach” | (lindaghill.com)


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Thursday Tree Love: Bald Cypress, Blue Skies, and Spanish Moss

These cypress trees live in and around the lake at a city park David and I visited in December. The walk around the lake is five miles which I’ve done in years past and might do again one day. Most of the trees are hung with Spanish moss, which is not technically a moss, but is a bromeliad, a flowering plant. I’ve never noticed the flowers, which must be small, so I’m going to look more closely this spring. In French Polynesia, Spanish moss is called, “grandpa’s beard.”

Many years ago, I draped Spanish moss over black lace on a pith helmet for a Halloween costume. First I had to shake the moss out and wash it having discovered tiny insects living in it. I got an honorable mention in the costume contest and was dubbed “The Swamp Witch.” Now, I leave the Spanish moss and the tiny insects in the trees where they belong.

Bald cypress and Spanish moss are common in swamps of the southern US

You can click on the following photos individually for a better look and descriptions.

Wishing you blue skies and plenty of tree love!

Thursday Tree Love is hosted by Parul Thakur on the second and fourth Thursday of each month.

For more Tree Love, visit:

#ThursdayTreeLove – 102 – happiness and food


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Good News Tuesday for Dec. 29, 2020: Learning by Radio, Vaccines for New Zealand’s Neighbors, the Woman who Stopped Monsanto, and the Girl who Saved a Shark

Seeking Balance One Tuesday at a Time

Distance Learning by Radio

In many places around the world, lack of internet and TV access prevents distance learning. This is particularly challenging for girls and young women who may be pressured to do more household chores or marry early since not going to school. An organization called Mercy Corps has been helping young women continue education using radio programs. To read about how this works in Nigeria, Nepal, and Jordan, click here.

New Zealand Buys COVID 19 Vaccines for Pacific Neighbors

New Zealand’s government will be supporting its Pacific neighbors by making sure they have access to COVID – 19 vaccines. They will be purchasing enough vaccines for Tokelau, Niue, and the Cook Islands as well as Polynesian neighbors Samoa, Tonga, and Tuvalu if needed. I was curious how close these islands are to the New Zealand mainland and was surprised at the vast distances between these islands. Here’s more from The Good News Network.

The Woman Who Stopped Monsanto

Indigenous Mayan beekeeper Leydy Pech was awarded the 2020 Goldman Prize often called the environmental Nobel. Ms. Pech formed and led a coalition that “successfully halted Monsanto’s planting of genetically modified soybeans in southern Mexico.” I hope you will read more about her work at the link below where you will find her brief but powerful acceptance speech. Leydy Pech – Goldman Environmental Foundation : Goldman Environmental Foundation (goldmanprize.org)

Eleven Year Old Saves a Young Shark

At a beach in Australia, eleven year old Billie Rae saw a small shark stuck between some rocks. She quickly and carefully picked up the shark and carried it to safety. I can’t help but admire Billie’s poise and courage.

Got good news?

Please share in the comments!


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Thursday Tree Love #100: Deep Roots with Haiku

“Deep Roots are not reached by the frost.” JRR Tolkien

This weathered tree stands on a giant sand dune called “Sugarloaf” at Carolina Beach State Park. You might think that with roots exposed to much weather and erosion, the tree could topple any time. The view below suggests that its roots run deep where they can anchor into the sandy soil.

These trees have withstood hurricanes for decades.

Next, is a view from the top of “Sugarloaf.”

Tidal river trees

Standing strong for many years

Deep roots reaching down

Weather has its way

While deepest roots anchored well

Leave ghostly remnants.

At the bottom of the hill are remains of trees that stood tall long ago

Maybe these were once cypress trees.

I imagine their deep roots intertwine well below the surface.

Below is another tree at the bottom of the hill, but further back from the water. Sorry I don’t know their names (feel free to guess), but I certainly admire their perseverance.

This one seems to be holding its own.

I’m excited to be part of the 100th edition of Thursday Tree Love hosted by Parul Thakur. For more tree love, visit:

#ThursdayTreeLove – 100 – happiness and food


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Thursday Tree Love: Live Oak with Spanish Moss



This particular southern live oak lives in Airlie Gardens near the coast of North Carolina.

The grounds keepers were just starting to decorate for the holidays, but nature has already decorated with Spanish Moss catching the afternoon sunlight.

My favorite work of human art in the gardens is this bottle house which also catches the sunlight.

Thursday Tree Love is hosted by Tharul Pakur on the second and fourth Thursday of each month.

For more tree love, visit:

#ThursdayTreeLove – 99 – happiness and food